That Which You Hate

Okay Shelby, so here’s my question: 

If you hate being a secretary, why do you define yourself as that?

I get that right now you make your living being a secretary – you make a great living at it.  But is it truly who you are?  Or is it what you do to make ends meet?

It’s important to make the distinction.  And might help you from feeling so down.

I understand it’s difficult to say you’re a poet, a painter, or any creative entity, when in fact what you’re doing to pay the bills is secretarial work. But the problem with defining yourself as something you hate to do is that you are constantly aligning yourself with something negative. When we align ourselves with something negative, it reverberates throughout our inner and outer being.  It affects every part of us.  And the more we do it, the more habit forming it is, the easier it is for us to be sad most days.  When you define yourself as a secretary, or something you loathe, your whole body feels it.  You don’t say it with enthusiasm, you don’t say it with joy, you certainly don’t say it with power – you say it almost “matter-of-factly” or you say it with embarrassment. You say it with sadness, maybe even with a sense of hatred. How can you be in a place of “okay-ness” when you’re starting off so negatively?

Try a little test:  instead of saying to yourself: “I’m a secretary.”  Take a moment and say “I’m a painter.”  Don’t think of the financial implications or what your spouse or family would think.  Just say – whatever it is- out loud:

“I’m a writer.”

“I’m a poet.”

“I’m an artist.”

Did you notice the happiness?  The giggle?  Did you smile when you said it?  Did you feel a little silly, a tiny bit of joy?

That’s because it’s possible that WHO YOU ARE is very different from what you do for a living.

Stop defining yourself as that which you hate – and instead, make the distinction between what you do to make ends meet financially verses who you really are.

Now the real question is: do you know who you really are?